Ireland Air Ambulance ceases trading

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 12 January 2011 | News Tagged with: Ireland Law / policy Management Ireland Air Ambulance (IAA), which was established to provide an air ambulance for Northern Ireland, has announced that it has ceased trading.The current IAA organisation was set up last year following difficulties with its predecessor, also called IAA, which hit the headlines because of governance and fundraising difficulties. In particular, its accounts showed that it spent most of its money on fundraising and administrative expenses.The IAA said that it had ceased trading immediately because it wanted to “wind up all operations without any further liabilities”.Bill Megraw, Interim Chief Executive said: “The new board and a small number of paid employees have worked tirelessly to turn around the situation, however, have accepted that they are no longer in a position to do so at this time”.In 2009 a BBC investigation revealed that 90% of the money collected by the Ireland Air Ambulance charity in its first year went on wages and overheads.The organisation’s most recent accounts for 2009 show that it raised £478,000, with £387,265 spent on ‘charitable purposes’. Most of the expenditure described as charitable, however, was for staff and fundraising. In the accounts it said that a viable air ambulance service will require income of £125,000 per month but in 2009 the total amount left after administrative and fundraising costs was just under £70,000.The ‘new’ IAA was set up in response to the bad publicity surrounding the charity and scepticism about its ability to provide a service without the support of the health authorities. IAA says the NI Health and Social Care board is commissioning a study into the provision of an ambulance helicopter service.www.irelandairambulance.com/newpage.html  103 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Ireland Air Ambulance ceases tradinglast_img read more

New CEO starts at Institute of Fundraising

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. New CEO starts at Institute of Fundraising Tagged with: Institute of Fundraising Management Recruitment / people  36 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 3 October 2011 | News Peter Lewis, the new Chief Executive of the Institute of Fundraising, starts work at its London headquarters today.In his first weeks Peter will meet fundraising professionals and volunteers across the UK, attend one of the Institute’s one-day conferences and visit organisational members including the National Trust, Action on Hearing Loss, Tate and Breakthrough Breast Cancer. He will also meet fundraisers in Scotland and Wales.Lewis said: “The IoF is at the forefront of the charity fundraising profession and I will ensure that the organisation continues to meet the growing and changing needs of fundraisers and the wider charitable sector. Fundraisers are the lifeblood of many charities and the bottom line is the more better trained and better supported fundraisers we have, the more cash we will have coming in to UK charities.”www.institute-of-fundraising.org.uklast_img read more

Environment Funding Guide

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisement Environment Funding Guide [amzn_product_post]Fully revised and updated, the 4th edition of the Environment Funding Guide provides invaluable and practical information on sources of funding for environmental groups. This edition highlights funding opportunities from grant-making charities, companies and from statutory sources including local and central government and at European level. In addition the book covers landfill tax credit schemes. As well as providing comment on the current political and fundraising climate, the book offers helpful ./guidance on getting started in fundraising, developing a fundraising strategy, preparing a fundraising budget and writing a good application. Howard Lake | 7 April 2013 | Newslast_img read more

Regent’s Place Community Fund awards £30,000 to Camden charities

first_img  87 total views,  1 views today Melanie May | 29 September 2016 | News Regent’s Place Community Fund awards £30,000 to Camden charities Tagged with: community foundations Funding Regent’s Place Community Fund, a collaboration between companies based in Regent’s Place and which launched in April this year, has awarded five new charitable projects up to £9,000 each.Under the scheme, the companies have collaborated to pool £30,000 to invest in small community projects in the local Camden area, focusing on causes that support skills and access to employment, social cohesion, and healthy living.The founding funders are Capital One, Dentsu Aegis Network, Gazprom Marketing & Trading and lendlease, supported by fellow founders Regent’s Place Management and landlord British Land. The fund is managed by The London Community Foundation.In total, 27 charity and community group applied for funding. The five successful projects have been awarded the full total they applied for, with grants ranging from £5,000-£9,000.The charities are: C4WS Homeless Project (C4WS), Camden People’s Theatre, Third Age Project, New Diorama Theatre, and Scene & Heard.Sarah Hicks, branch director at Santander and panel member said:“Our businesses came together to provide increased support to grassroots projects in our community, to help those unsung small charities and community groups in our neighbourhood who are making a big difference to local people in need. We were very impressed with the quality of the applications we received and we’re pleased to have been able to fund such a diverse range of projects with the first grants from the new fund.”Picture: Regent’s Place campus Advertisementcenter_img  88 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

NI Foundation provided £900,000 to charitable causes

first_imgNI Foundation provided £900,000 to charitable causes About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement Tagged with: Funding Northern Ireland Research / statistics Howard Lake | 3 April 2017 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7  185 total views,  1 views today One of Northern Ireland’s largest foundations made donations of nearly £900,000 in 2015, according to its latest accounts.The McClay Foundation was set up by the late Sir Allen McClay who made his fortune in the pharmaceutical business. The bulk of the Foundation’s giving is directed to causes in Northern Ireland, although some developing world charities are also supported.The Foundation’s priorities are to:·       Support and encourage research and innovation·       Advance the use of diagnostic tools and drugs in the prevention, control and cure of disease·       Ensure latest advances in healthcare are available to all, including developing countries·       Generate and promote employment opportunities·       Support and promote such educational purposes as the trustees shall select, provided that such purposes shall be exclusively charitable in lawDonations in 2014 were over £1 million with Queens University Belfast one of the largest grant recipients with £600,000 in 2014 and £260,000 in 2015. Cancer charities also figure large in the Foundation’s regular giving, with the NI Hospice receiving £400,000 over two years and large grants to Clic Sargent, Marie Cure and NI Children’s Cancer Fund.  The McClay Foundation is happy to provide support over more than one year and the accounts show future commitments of over £2 million to many of the same causes.In 2014 £90 million was given to the Foundation from the sale of Almac shares, the pharmaceutical company founded by Sir Allen.  Some of the Foundation’s board are associated with the Almac company.  186 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7last_img read more

Five tweets for fundraisers on 15 August 2017

first_img3. Round as a poundThere are now more new one pound coins in circulation than old round pounds. But there’s still time to encourage supporters to donate the older ones before the deadline of 15 October.And ask them to look out for the Edinburgh and Cardiff city £1 coins: they are the rarest version of the round pound and could be worth from £25 to £50, according to Change Checker. Howard Lake | 15 August 2017 | News 5. A new hope – for copywritingThese are the words you are looking for. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6  130 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Fundraising Regulator Humour Money Twitter Five tweets for fundraisers on 15 August 2017 2. Future philanthropyTomorrow’s philanthropy explained in a slideshare within a tweet, rather than a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, thanks to Professor Jen Shang. Here is another in our occasional round-up of tweets of interest to fundraisers. We’ve searched and selected some views, ideas, opportunities, challenges, humour and sometimes simply peculiar stories. 4. Rubber necking at rubber duckshttps://twitter.com/Complex/status/893193004235636736 1. When is voluntary involuntary?For a voluntary levy, there’s a surprisingly wide range of organisations trying to persuade (again!) all relevant charities to pay it. Main image: blue bird from the New York Public Library  129 total views,  1 views todaylast_img read more

Cure Leukaemia appeals for old pound coins throughout Blood Cancer Awareness Month

first_imgJames McLaughlin, Chief Executive of Cure Leukaemia, commented: “This summer has seen bears across Birmingham appearing to help raise funds, and for the next few weeks we are hoping that our pigs will also spread across the region!“This feeds into our larger ‘Just One More’ campaign in September, which believes that great things can be achieved if many can give a little. For example, if everyone in the city donated just one more pound, over £1m would be raised by this campaignalone.” Howard Lake | 20 September 2017 | News Cure Leukaemia is also hoping that fans of Wolverhampton Wanderers will join the campaign in support of the Club’s Number 1, Carl Ikeme. The Nigerian player was diagnosed with Acute Leukaemia in July and the whole Wolves family has united to raise funds in support of him with over £75,000 raised for Cure Leukaemia to date.The charity’s fundraising team is hoping the already generous fans will donate ‘Just One More’ £1 to support their number one. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Birmingham-based blood cancer charity Cure Leukaemia has tied in the imminent disappearance of the old round pounds with September’s Blood Cancer Awareness Month to maximise its fundraising.The charity has distributed a large collection of piggy banks around the city, inviting the public to donate their old pound coins before they are taken out of circulation on 15 October.Don’t hog old £1 coinsThe charity is reminding people not to hog their old £1 coins. All the money raised will contribute to Cure Leukaemia’s £1m Centre Appeal to fund the expansion of the Centre for Clinical Haematology at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.Cure Leukaemia’s piggy bank in a swine bar?It is inviting businesses, schools and individuals around the region to host a piggy bank for the month and collect as many old coins as they can until 15 October. Participants who don’t think this campaign is boar-ing so far include KPMG, Intercity Technology, Malmaison, Purnell’s Bistro & Ginger’s Bar, The Binding Site, the Cure Leukaemia nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, and East Village.The 8th Solihull (St. Augustine’s) Brownie group has also taken 14 piggy banks to fundraise with. Cure Leukaemia appeals for old pound coins throughout Blood Cancer Awareness Month Tagged with: Individual giving Money Design-your-ownThe piggy banks are all paint-your-own pigs, so that those hosting them can make their mark and customise them. Cure Leukaemia hope that supporters will be creative and “prove that you can put lipstick on a pig to make all the difference!”The charity is running competitions for the best-dressed pig on social media.  174 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2  173 total views,  1 views todaylast_img read more

£10,000-£3m grants available through £92m Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage

first_img Applications are open for the £92 million Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage, which is aimed at helping heritage organisations recover from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.The Fund is part of the wider £1.57billion Culture Recovery Fund, which is the Government’s biggest one-off investment in the sector to date.The Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage is open to:Heritage organisations managing a heritage site or visitor attractionPrivate owners of a heritage site, venue or attractionOrganisations managing, maintaining or caring for culturally significant assets or collectionsBusinesses that are a vital part of the heritage ecosystem, including conservators, contractors, specialists and suppliersOrganisations that manage culturally significant assets or collectionsNon-accredited museums are eligible (Accredited museums and those working towards accreditation should apply to the Culture Recovery Fund through Arts Council England)The deadline for applications is midday on Monday 17 August.Grants are available from £10,000 up to £3million. Applicants need to have a plan for how they will operate and be sustainable for the remainder of this financial year. They also need to be able to demonstrate their international, national or local significance. Smaller, local organisations should demonstrate the role they play in cultural engagement with people from all backgrounds, the opportunities they create and how they benefit their local community and area.Funds will be distributed by The National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England on behalf of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.Sir Laurie Magnus, Chairman of Historic England said:“This crucial funding will help the organisations and businesses who look after our locally-cherished historic sites. It is a recognition that investing directly in historic places can bring wide ranging social benefits, inspiring communities to engage with their past and encouraging creativity, regeneration and growth.” Advertisement Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden added:“This support package will protect buildings, organisations and people to help ensure our wonderful institutions, big and small, pull through Covid.“We’re publishing guidance so organisations know how to access help. We’re also calling on organisations to be creative in diversifying their income streams and the public to continue supporting the places they love so this funding can be spread as far and wide as possible.”The wider Culture Recovery Fund will see grants of up to £3 million allocated to arts, cultural and heritage organisations. Separate portions of the funding are being distributed by Arts Council England for arts and culture, and the British Film Institute for film and cinema, and in collaboration with The National Lottery Heritage Fund.  509 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Melanie May | 3 August 2020 | News £10,000-£3m grants available through £92m Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage  510 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 Tagged with: COVID-19 Funding heritage About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Autoworkers’ rebellion shakes India

first_imgIt should be remembered that auto mogul Henry Ford employed 3,000 gangsters at his Rouge plant outside Detroit to try to stop workers from joining the United Auto Workers. But company violence couldn’t stop the union drive at Ford, and it won’t stop the workers in India.Most recently, Indian autoworkers at Maruti Suzuki’s Manesar plant rebelled on July 18 against company goons and police. The huge factory, located 20 miles south of Delhi, India, can produce 550,000 cars per year.The rebellion was sparked by a supervisor who abused and insulted a Dalit worker — whose caste used to be known as “the untouchables” — and then the worker protested. Instead of taking any action against the supervisor and without any investigation, company managers suspended the worker.The Maruti Suzuki Workers Union issued a statement on July 19 in which its president, Ram Meher, asserted that when workers and union representatives were negotiating with management about this suspension, the company called in “hundreds of bouncers on its payroll to attack the workers. … The gates were closed by the security on behest of the management and the bouncers brutally attacked the workers with sharp weapons and arms.” (NDTV.com)The union official explained further: “They [the bouncers], joined by some of the managerial staff and police later, beat up a number of workers, who have had to be hospitalised with serious injuries. The bouncers … also destroyed company property and set fire to a portion of the factory. The gates were later opened to oust the workers and enforce a lockout by the company.”Although the company’s officials are blaming the workers and denying any were injured, it is clear that the workers were defending themselves. Many were injured.Instead of rounding up the bouncers, India’s capitalist government arrested 91 workers on July 18 for their alleged involvement in the events that day. Among them was Yogesh Kumar, the local union’s organizing secretary. Police are hunting down all 3,000 workers in its “murder investigation,” blaming them for the death of the “human relations” boss who died in the fire that was set by the company thugs.The company has now declared a lockout of the workers at the Manesar plant.The labor movement in the U.S. must protest this anti-union witch hunt, and show solidarity with fellow union members in India.Autoworkers produce 94 cars an hourConditions in the Manesar plant are intolerable. A car rolls off the assembly line every 38 seconds. That’s 94 cars per hour. Arriving a second late to punch in means a worker gets a pay cut. Returning even a minute late from the two allowed breaks results in losing a half-day’s pay.These workers have fought hard for a union. They had to go on three strikes last year, lasting a total of 64 days, just to get union recognition.Regular workers get 13,000 rupees per month, which is worth $236. But 40 percent of the workers are temporary “contract” workers who get just 5,000 rupees or $91 monthly.This superexploitation resulted in Maruti Suzuki getting $60,000 in profit off each of its workers. This outfit makes 45 percent of India’s cars and is majority owned by Suzuki Motor Corporation of Japan. Most of the rest is owned by Indian financial institutions.However, it isn’t just Japanese and Indian capital that are exploiting these workers. Germany’s Volkswagen owns 20 percent of Suzuki, a stake that used to be owned by General Motors.The struggle at the Maruti Suzuki plant “has sent shock waves through corporate boardrooms … at home and abroad,” said R. V. Kanoria, president of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry. (Financial Times, July 22)Moreover, it must be resonating through India’s 1.2 billion people, over one-sixth of humanity.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Solidarity Day 6 in Boston: Hundreds demand ‘Drop the charges’ in anti-union frame-up

first_imgAfter two charges were dropped at hearing, union militant Stevan Kirschbaum speaks to crowd of Boston bus drivers and other supporters.WW photo: Brenda RyanDorchester, Mass. — It was the second pre-trial hearing for Stevan Kirschbaum, a founder of Steelworkers Union Local 8751 of Boston’s school bus drivers and chair of the union’s Grievance Committee.As with the first court hearing in this saga of company repression versus union militancy, his fellow drivers, other unionists and supporters from the community once again packed the courtroom here on Oct. 6. Some 300 turned out to show they completely reject the bonus charges filed against their brother by the multi-billion-dollar transnational Veolia Corp., which holds the contract to run Boston’s school buses and has been trying to undermine their union.Team Solidarity, the voice of the militant umbrella group called United School Bus Union Workers, which has brought together bus workers from several cities in the greater Boston area, had called for packing the court on this Solidarity Day 6 to demand that the anti-union, frame-up charges against Kirschbaum be dropped.From left to right: Georgia Scott, Monica Moorehead and Lela Roseboro. Team Solidarity leaders Scott and Roseboro and WW managing editor Moorehead spoke at the Oct. 6 Dorchester rally.WW photo: Brenda RyanThe call for solidarity was heeded. The overflow crowd, mainly school bus drivers who came originally from Haiti and Cape Verde, packed the courtroom, including sitting on the floor, and also held a picketline outside the courthouse in Dorchester, Mass.Kirschbaum had been hit by Boston police with four bogus felony charges in early July. The charges were issued after a June 30 rally and march in the school bus yards demanding that Kirschbaum, along with three other union leaders — Andre Francois, Garry Murchison and Steve Gillis — be reinstated to their jobs as drivers following their illegal firing by the France-based Veolia conglomerate last November. Veolia is notorious for union-busting and privatizing tactics, here and worldwide.Inside the courtroom, the Veolia/Boston police frame-up began to unravel. The court dismissed two of the felonies: breaking and entering and malicious destruction of property. People’s lawyers Barry Wilson and John Pavlos provided a militant and defiant defense, pounding away at the lies by the state and Veolia, revealing them to be fabrications and an outrageous frame-up.Not a shred of credible evidence was provided by the prosecution. Veolia supplied fraudulent and falsified documents. Veolia and the state once again tried — but failed — to get a court order barring Kirschbaum from the bus yards. It was an obvious effort to deny the membership their representation rights, since Kirschbaum hears and acts on many grievances by the workers.Attorneys Wilson and Pavlos argued expertly for the dismissal of all the charges. The judge refused their request, however, and scheduled the trial on the two remaining charges for Nov. 24. The demonstrators then marched from the courtroom and held a fiery occupation, picket and rally in front of the court.As the hated union-buster and general manager of Veolia, Alex Roman, and his assistant manager left the court, they got a taste of justified anger as the workers and their supporters booed Roman and chanted “Union!”The workers vowed to continue the struggle until all the charges are dropped, the four illegally fired union leaders are reinstated, and a just contract is won.“Pack the court house Nov. 24!” Rehire the 4 illegally fired USW 8751 leaders! Contract Justice NOW! For more info go to http://bostonschoolbus5.org/ and to donate to support the 4 fired leaders visit http://www.youcaring.com/other/support-the-fired-8751-leaders-drop-the-bogus-charges-/214181″FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more